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  1. #1
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    Jul 2008
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    Default cormorant damage

    I have attached a link that someone posted on the sea trout forums, very informative and well worth a watch if not somewhat depressing


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Limerick
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    Excellent presentation! Facts & Figures that's what will kick the Government Agencies asses into gear to stop these greedy Comorant's eating their body weight of fish per day.
    Last edited by Darra O'Connell; 06-12-2017 at 04:04 PM.
    Fly Fishing & Rugby a Marriage made in Heaven.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darra O'Connell View Post
    Excellent presentation! Facts & Figures that's what's will kick the Government Agencies asses into gear to stop these greedy Comorant's eating there body weight of fish per day.
    There is great pressure being exerted on DEFRA to get cormorants back on the general licence. I happened to have lunch with a fairly senior civil servant in DEFRA the other day and she was quite supportive and indicated the government would certainly consider it. There is some hope but providing good data is vital. Anyone who lives near a river or lake should record every sighting of inland cormorants in as detailed a way as possible, even just noted on a mobile. Photos, especially of damaged fish and predation taking place are really useful. DEFRA now accept the presence of cormorants as proof of damage to fisheries, we are working on gooseanders! Anyone on the Exe system who can help, please PM me.

  4. #4

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    It looks increasingly likely that Goosanders and mergansers numbers are multiplying on most rivers each year and are taking a huge toll of fish including juvenile Salmon and Seatrout (about 10-12 each per day) some river managers/boards have applied for a licence to cull a limited number i.e the river Dee has a licence but its neighbour the Don does not, While fishing the upper Don one day this season i saw a flock of about 20-30 of these birds this is on a part of the river that is narrow and and for the most part shallow can you imagine the havoc these birds have wrecked on the nursery habitat of the Salmonoids.
    Scaring the birds does not solve the problem only shifts it to another part of the river,in the winter the local population of these birds are swelled several fold by visitors from Scandinavia taking vast amounts of fish.
    There is one thing that the RSPB are good at that the Salmon fishing fraternity are not and that is protecting the species that they represent.
    Is it not time that all river managers/trusts/boards said enough is enough and all applied for a licence to cull these birds along with Cormorants. If the government/s are inundated with requests for a licence they might then realise how big the problem is.

    P.S if the licence is for a limited number make sure it is females.

  5. #5

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    Read something the other day about laser bird scaring and it seems like green lasers spook them for quite some time.

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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rrrr View Post
    Read something the other day about laser bird scaring and it seems like green lasers spook them for quite some time.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
    They are effective, we use them on gooseanders and cormorants. It is best to have a good coordinated plan, rather than act in an ad hoc way. If you can keep them off an extended section of river they will move somewhere with less disturbance. If you can make life uncomfortable for them in key juvenile production areas it has to help. There does come a time when they realise you can't actually hurt them though. With cormorants we can then shoot the smart ones 😁😁😁, but not with gooseanders. We can shoot to scare which keeps them nervous though, but obviously the area we can patrol with guns is far more limited than can be patrolled with a laser pen. We applied for a licence to shoot a very few to aid scaring but so far have always been refused.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Makemland
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    1,766

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rrrr View Post
    Read something the other day about laser bird scaring and it seems like green lasers spook them for quite some time.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
    It works well on Herring Gulls.
    I have a green laser pen and it scares the **** out of the fekkers when they are being a pest around my street.
    It would work a lot better mounted on a rifle..
    This is my fishing rod!.
    There are many like it but this one is mine.
    Without me,my rod is useless!.
    Without my rod,i am useless!.

  8. #8

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    For those who didn't see it, this video clip of mergansers emptying a pool on the River Endrick was posted on the Loch Lomond thread.


  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wee-Eck View Post
    For those who didn't see it, this video clip of mergansers emptying a pool on the River Endrick was posted on the Loch Lomond thread.

    Thatís team work


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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Yorkshire (were there a god it'd be god's own country)
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    3,113

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    Grand watch, thanks for posting.

    The conference procedings are all here on SFF too : AST Conference Materials now online - From Headwater to Headland

    Lots of interesting stuff in there.


    To me, there are two main take-away messages from that presentation:

    1. Restoration of "extinct" salmon stocks in Denmark was achieved merely by removal of barriers to migration. The message of recovering rivers again rings loud above the bluster of "All At Sea" etc.

    2. About 28 minutes in, he gives an interesting take on the 2013-2015 depression in salmon catches (note it's only a minor depression in a strong upwards trend): Basically the years that had really hard winters, 2009 to 2010 caused the cormorants to move into rivers in greater numbers, decimating the pre-smolts and smolt runs and causing a depression in stocks. Interesting, if applicable outside Denmark, and may be a contributing factor as to why the best GB salmon spawning years for decades (2010/11) lead to a low catch when the progeny returned...
    "...hooking mortality is higher than you'd expect: further evidence that as a numbers game, catch-and-release fishing isn't always as straightforward as it seems"
    John Gierach


    Fed up of debating C&R - see Hidden Content

    Unless otherwise stated, data used in any graph/figure/table are Crown copyright, used with the permission of MSS and/or EA and/or ICES. MSS / EA / ICES are not responsible for interpretation of these data by third parties

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