Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0

View Poll Results: Are you willing to fish barbless all the time when salmon fishing?

Voters
53. This poll is closed
  • Yes

    18 33.96%
  • No

    35 66.04%
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1

    Default Should we fish barbless?

    Hi All,

    In this age where we see greater emphasis on conservation of salmon stocks should we fish barbless? Irrespective of the beat's policy, be it C&R, kill only.....whatever. Use the thread to put forward your views.

    The poll is a simple yes or no.

    Cheers,

    Jock
    Last edited by Jock; 19-01-2008 at 07:55 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Clitheroe Lancs
    Posts
    1,767

    Default

    I would not like to use barbless hooks all the time even though I release over 90% of the fish I catch. I dont think that barbless hooks loose you any more fish than barbed ones but feel that they can move about more and cause more dammage than a barbed hook. I have never had a problem removing a barbed hook from salmon or sea trout and allways carry a good set of pliers and forceps for removing the hook. I guess the important thing is that more fish are being returned and as long as they are handled correctly with the minimum of fuss then the barb should not be an issue.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BOOMTOWN
    Posts
    2,251

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wilbert View Post
    I would not like to use barbless hooks all the time even though I release over 90% of the fish I catch. I dont think that barbless hooks loose you any more fish than barbed ones but feel that they can move about more and cause more dammage than a barbed hook. I have never had a problem removing a barbed hook from salmon or sea trout and allways carry a good set of pliers and forceps for removing the hook. I guess the important thing is that more fish are being returned and as long as they are handled correctly with the minimum of fuss then the barb should not be an issue.
    dave

    I agree with every point you have made in this statement, nothin more needing added to it! IMHO scale loss is a bigger concern to a returned salmon....so folks keep them in the water and wet those hands before you handle them!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Northern Ireland, United Kingdom.
    Posts
    428

    Default

    I will always fish barbed hooks as long as fishery rules allow. Salmon are often hard enough to keep a hold of when hooked without decreasing our chances more. Wilbert and onthedangle, I reckon spot on in both your reasonings.

    However, I find the ridiculously ignorant barbs found on some salmon hooks, such as on Esmond Drury trebles completely superfluous. A larger barb also requires a larger force to drive home. I have always reckoned that micro-barbs, as found on many trout hooks, would the way to go for hook manufacturers.
    Last edited by roecaster; 20-01-2008 at 12:53 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ashland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,290

    Exclamation Hell's Bells.

    Haven't fished with a 'barbed hook' in years. I'm going to release (long or short range) 99.9% of my fish. Make it easier.

    Hoo Raaa.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Beauly - sort of
    Posts
    467

    Default

    I voted yes last night but neglected to post something as it's a good topic - well done Mr G ..... most of, but not all, my trout fishing is now done with de-barbed or barbless hooks simply as a rule I prefer to fish C&R these days.
    With Salmon I have moved to crimping down/flattening the more extreme barbs (the ED was a good example from roecaster) but the likes of Partridge Salar hooks seem more 'gentle'............. if such a term can be applied to a barbed hook
    I increasingly use Fulling Mill circle hooks for trout fishing (with the barb flattened) and have yet to lose a fish which has solidly taken. I wonder if there's any merit in adapting that design to salmon 'irons', certainly the more contemporary hook designs seem to be heading towards a more upswept point..... if you follow me

    In Verbo Tuo Laxabo Rete

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Blairgowrie
    Posts
    228

    Default

    I flatten down my hooks as I come across them.Simply put,it is vastly easier to remove the hook .
    If everyone used barbless hooks there would be little or no visitors to accident and emergency ! You could remove the hook yourself,in most cases.
    Christ knows they have enough to do
    Smile,its catching

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    4,108

    Default

    Good question,it made me think. I absolutley always remove the barb for grayling and trout fishing, but never for salmon. Why? well I just think I have read somewhere that the nature of their mouth means you should use a barb to avoid tearing. now, from the comments above I'm minded to re think and look forward to more conteibutiona I've released all my fish to date, although I've been tempted. I guess I would only take a fish if it was injured and likley to suffer.

  9. #9

    Default

    There isn't a right and wrong answer to this question IMHO. Both have their strong points in the debate.

    I don't buy into the barbless hook moving around more and also removing a barbed hook always causes more damage and is more difficult than removing a barbless IMO.

    I reckon lots of salmon that are lost by anglers are because they don't set the hook well, usually in the panic of realising they have a fish on. I hear a lot more novice and holiday anglers talking about the number of fish they lost than seasoned anglers (this said I lost 8 consecutive fish this season, then landed 11 out of the next 12). On this count the barbless requires less effort to set and the fish could quite often do it for you, possibly less so with a barbed hook especially the big barbs.

    I certainly think all trebles should be barbless or at best have only one barb. It works for the pike fishermen.

    I also think circumstances can justifiably dictate whether you should be barbless or not. If you are fishing low down a river system and there are pools full of fresh fish and you have decided the next fish is going home with you then a barbed treble would be justified. In contrast at the back end when the chances of a bar of silver is slim and there are lots of coloured fish around then a barbless double would be my choice.

    Although I can see both sides of the coin, I voted barbless.

  10. #10

    Default

    I voted no and never fish barbless unless I have to. I'm not convinced that either method does any more or less harm to the fishes mouth but I feel more confident using barbs. There's no doubt in my mind that the key to keeping a fish on is striking hard and fast and (I shouldn't say it!) I very seldom lose a fish on the fly. I quite often lose them on rapalas though, in spite of the 2 or 3 trebles.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •