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  1. #1

    Default Fishing pools with sandy bottoms.

    When fishing a salmon river and you come to pool with a lot of sand on bed of river do you move on fast or fish it carefully. I normally don't like sandy bottoms when salmon fishing, and pass the pool fast.

  2. #2

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    On a beat of the River Don I fish regularly one of the best pools on the beat, if not the whole river has a sandy bottom. It consistantly produces loads of fish and accounts for the majority of salmon caught each season on the beat.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig View Post
    On a beat of the River Don I fish regularly one of the best pools on the beat, if not the whole river has a sandy bottom. It consistantly produces loads of fish and accounts for the majority of salmon caught each season on the beat.
    HI Craig -thats an interesting one - do the fish lie on the sand, just as they would over shingle/rock etc? Or do they tend to sit near another structure eg boulder/tree root etc?
    Zn

  4. #4

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    There are several large rocks on the bottom as well and this tends to be where the fish sit but the river bed itself is sandy. The pool is also fairly deep and is tree lined all the way down which keeps the sun off the pool and the water dark for most of the day. Maybe this is why the fish sit in the pool?
    Last edited by Craig; 19-10-2015 at 07:12 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Marshfield Nr Bath
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    3,555

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    The reason that Scotland and the North of England have more salmon than most rivers in the south is because they have more rock in them. Salmon like to lie most of the time on bed rock. Seatrout prefer shingle/small stones hence Wales is good for Seatrout.

    Just my opinion and is a generalisation I know.

    Paul

  6. #6

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    I find sea trout like sandy or fine shingle beds, but salmon no, I think only as you say when there are big stones lying about in the deeper pots, salmon will lie there, but if there are no big boulders and predormantly the river bed is sandy, I never feel confident going through it.

  7. #7

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    I would certainly never "pass the pool fast".
    If anything, I would slow up and enjoy the fact that I'm not wading through, around or over ankle breaking boulders.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Arbeg haze or River Tay
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    1,048

    Default

    Personaly I find if I am fishing with a sandy bottom unless I move quickly to clear it the chaffing can be quite unbearable.and#128565;

  9. #9

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    Most of the West Ranga in Iceland has a bottom of volcanic sand - this is the reason why there is virtually no natural spawning. It's a clear river, and in a number of pools you can see the fish. They certainly don't seem to have any problem with lying on sand there.

  10. #10

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    One pool I fish has a run of sandy bottom about 20 feet long and 2 metres wide and the river bed either side is gravel . the sandy section is were I catch all the fish running through this particular pool with a rise on the river..... And another pool I fish spins around like a clock face its a large sandy bottom pool and holds a lot of fish in low water . the fish are often facing what you would call down stream in this pool facing into the clockwise swirl .often the larger trout are found in this pool . the pool produces fish in all heights ....so I would not skip to quickly past sandy pools ....

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