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  1. #1

    Default Salmon fishing history

    Would the tackle historians be able to assist with some information? Just curious being relatively new to salmon fishing and fortunate to be able to use modern equipment when the major advances in tackle actually took place?

    Split cane to man made materials and their evolution through glass fibre to carbon etc.
    Wooden reels to metal.
    Drag systems.
    Lines, silk/hair to the first synthetics/coated lines
    Flies. Single hooks to doubles and trebles.

    Im genuinely interested to hear how we have come to where we are but more so in when the major advances took place. Also would be interested in those who have tried "antique" equipment and had success with it.
    FISH ON!!! FISH OFF!!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Herts/Cambs
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    Doh, where's Compy when you need him...?

  3. #3

    Default

    The biggest change in effectiveness was the fixed spool reel and nylon monofilament line. This was pretty much perfected by the late 40's.

  4. #4

    Default

    Was kind of hoping for a bit more info on the rest
    FISH ON!!! FISH OFF!!!!

  5. #5
    TonyPrior Guest

    Default

    Just personal recollection of how it was in Aberdeen, Scotland, no guarantee of accuracy or general validity. Solid glass spinning rods were available from the late 1950's/early 60's. Cane fly rods were still extensively used both for salmon and trout in the late 1960's. Hollow glass Fibatube blanks and rods, and some American-made hollow glass blanks, were creeping onto the scene by then, but were not the most common type of rod. Plastic lines, either braided strands like artificial silk or uPVC-coated, were available from the mid 1960's. By the early 1970's, hollow glass rods had all but replaced cane, and coated plastic lines had all but replaced silk lines. I bought my first carbon fly rod blanks from USA in the mid 1970's - I can't remember how common they were. Fly reels were pretty much all pawl check, variable tensioning or plain check, though Abu had produced a trout reel called the Delta with a dysfunctional disc-type drag. Waders in the early 1970's were either rubberised canvas 'Perfecto' chesties (worn with leather, hobnailed 'wading brogues' , or Dunlop black rubber thigh waders. The latter seemed to last for years. By the early 1980's, Simms Goretex waders were already a must-have. I sweated and froze in waxed cotton Barbours till the late 80's, though better alternatives were available by then, they were really costly. Monofilament was Bell, Kroic and Maxima, each of which had its fans. By the early 1980's co-polymer alternatives became increasingly available.

    It seems to me that most of the really game-changing modern developments in fishing tackle - i.e. graphite rods, coated plastic lines, Goretex and other breathable fabrics, took place during the 1970's and were in widespread use by the early-1980's. However, this is just personal experience and recollection.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Stirling
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    Bring back Racine Tortue.
    Respect My Authorita!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    North Yorkshire
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    Don't forget greenheart rods which were in widespread use from the 1800's and overlapped with the use of cane rods. They had their devotees and don't forget Grants record Spey cast with his huge greenheart rod has only recently been bettered. I believe a certain member of the royal family still uses a greenheart rod exclusively!


    SP8

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    East Midlands
    Posts
    620

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    Hairwing flies!

  9. #9

    Default

    I pretty much agree with Tony. I'm no expert, but to take your questions in order, my feeling is that:

    1. Split cane gave way to glass in the late 60s/early 70s. Graphite came in in the mid/late 70s, but many early rods were prone to breakage. By the early 1980s they were much more reliable and from then on they more or less superseded glass.

    2. Wooden reels went out in the 19th century. I think the Hardy Perfect design, still in production today, originated around the 1890s.

    3. Drag systems other than simple click checks really came into general use in the early 1980s - the early System 2s were the first disc drag fly reels that I remember seeing. More sophisticated drags do in fact date back a long way further (I think vom Hofe was making them as early as 1895), and they continued until recently with specialist makers such as Stan Bogdan, but these were regarded as specialist items and not readily available to the public.

    4. Plastic lines came in in the 1960s. Interestingly, shooting heads were also available then, but failed to gain much popularity until much more recently.

    5. Flies - double hooks date back at least to the early 20th Century, and probably before that. Pryce-Tannatt mentions them in his book of 1914, though he didn't like them! I think Esmond Drury was the first to really popularise flies tied on trebles - I would guess in the 1960s. And although Wanless did devise a form of tube fly in the 1930s, they are really a post-war innovation. Similarly, Richard Waddington mentions his articulated shanks in his 1947 book, though the idea was clearly were still in development at the time.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by charlieH View Post
    I pretty much agree with Tony. I'm no expert, but to take your questions in order, my feeling is that:

    1. Split cane gave way to glass in the late 60s/early 70s. Graphite came in in the mid/late 70s, but many early rods were prone to breakage. By the early 1980s they were much more reliable and from then on they more or less superseded glass.

    2. Wooden reels went out in the 19th century. I think the Hardy Perfect design, still in production today, originated around the 1890s.

    3. Drag systems other than simple click checks really came into general use in the early 1980s - the early System 2s were the first disc drag fly reels that I remember seeing. More sophisticated drags do in fact date back a long way further (I think vom Hofe was making them as early as 1895), and they continued until recently with specialist makers such as Stan Bogdan, but these were regarded as specialist items and not readily available to the public.

    4. Plastic lines came in in the 1960s. Interestingly, shooting heads were also available then, but failed to gain much popularity until much more recently.

    5. Flies - double hooks date back at least to the early 20th Century, and probably before that. Pryce-Tannatt mentions them in his book of 1914, though he didn't like them! I think Esmond Drury was the first to really popularise flies tied on trebles - I would guess in the 1960s. And although Wanless did devise a form of tube fly in the 1930s, they are really a post-war innovation. Similarly, Richard Waddington mentions his articulated shanks in his 1947 book, though the idea was clearly were still in development at the time.
    Excellent. Many thanks for the post.
    FISH ON!!! FISH OFF!!!!

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