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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Default Mending the fly line

    Scottish Salmon Fishing Surgery

    Hi Guys we have just updated the "Fly cast" feature on the website which you can access using the link above, where we look at mending the fly line and what effects this has. Just wondering what peoples thoughts and experiences were on downstream and upstream mends?
    Tight lines,
    Sandy & Sam

  2. #2

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    Was just reading about this in this month's trout an salmon

  3. #3
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    Oct 2014
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    Aye, they would have done it better lol!

  4. #4
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    Nov 2012
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    Northampton
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    I havn't seen T&S yet so could be talking rubbish. I like my fly to lead when I cast so do believe in mending to keep the line upstream of the fly. When I cast square the main line is thicker than the running line and creates more resistance to the water and gets swept round faster dragging the fly with it. I do catch fish like this but not often. AS you say in slack water it improves the movement of the fly. In fact I only tend to fish square nowadays when using a big fly, sunray or similar. I see a lot of anglers stretching themselves throwing a good line but the fly lands upsteam and then gets dragged round by the line for most of the cast not fishing properly. If the flows faster on the opposite bank this allows a square cast but still allows the fly to lead. I know the modern take is not to mend but I'm still not convinced. When I'm fishing I hedge my bets and will usually make a conventional cast. then a squarer one before stepping down a pool.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    East Lothian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gibbo View Post
    I havn't seen T&S yet so could be talking rubbish. I like my fly to lead when I cast so do believe in mending to keep the line upstream of the fly. When I cast square the main line is thicker than the running line and creates more resistance to the water and gets swept round faster dragging the fly with it. I do catch fish like this but not often. AS you say in slack water it improves the movement of the fly. In fact I only tend to fish square nowadays when using a big fly, sunray or similar. I see a lot of anglers stretching themselves throwing a good line but the fly lands upsteam and then gets dragged round by the line for most of the cast not fishing properly. If the flows faster on the opposite bank this allows a square cast but still allows the fly to lead. I know the modern take is not to mend but I'm still not convinced. When I'm fishing I hedge my bets and will usually make a conventional cast. then a squarer one before stepping down a pool.
    I was standing on a high opposite bank a couple of seasons ago watching someones fly fish round.

    The guy was casting a little too square - but it wouldn't really have looked like it from where he was standing. The sort of slightly overly square we've all done from time to time when we're pushed for distance

    Even though the guy was trying to control the belly with a couple of mends I could see that it was not particularly effective. I would estimate that the fly was an honest half way through it's total swing before it started swimming properly (head upstream).

    It was a real eye opener for me because I was guilty (probably still am sometimes) of trying to stretch the distance a bit by going too square. It showed me that that was futile as the fly only fished properly mid stream onwards anyway. I think any downstream belly on a squarish cast in the first few seconds is a disaster (unless you've got some particular purpose and plan in mind eg stripped sunray or something)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    up to ma tits in water on the ayr
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    I dont mend nearly as much as i used to!!usually,,and there are times where ill constantly mend to achieve the path and speed i require(say when the river is split in half current wise because of a rock/boulder in the middle)
    But iv taken to do most of my mending now in the air(up or down stream) before the line lands on the water"very cool"very effective also
    trying to lift a head up from the water with running line will in all probability just move the fly away from where i wanted it thats how i see it anyway!!
    Id rather have something I don't need than need something I haven't got!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    East Lothian
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    yes, the difficulty (impossibility sometimes) of mending with a modern short head line is one of the two major drawbacks of them compared to say a 60' or greater head

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bridge of earn
    Posts
    139

    Default

    In my experience it depends on the river if I was fishing the lower beuly in May I wouldn't mend at all they love a fast fly but if I was on the Tay I would mend most of the time .

  9. #9

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    Small rivers, DT lines, total control. I have a concept I call salmon speed. That is the speed I like to fish the fly. It's not a constant, sadly, but a good indication is the speed a hitch fishes when it looks just right. Hmmm not sure that helps. If in doubt too fast is better than too slow. IMO.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ozzyian View Post
    I was standing on a high opposite bank a couple of seasons ago watching someones fly fish round.

    The guy was casting a little too square - but it wouldn't really have looked like it from where he was standing. The sort of slightly overly square we've all done from time to time when we're pushed for distance

    Even though the guy was trying to control the belly with a couple of mends I could see that it was not particularly effective. I would estimate that the fly was an honest half way through it's total swing before it started swimming properly (head upstream).

    It was a real eye opener for me because I was guilty (probably still am sometimes) of trying to stretch the distance a bit by going too square. It showed me that that was futile as the fly only fished properly mid stream onwards anyway. I think any downstream belly on a squarish cast in the first few seconds is a disaster (unless you've got some particular purpose and plan in mind eg stripped sunray or something)
    All I would say is don't fall into the trap of thinking a fish will only take a fly swimming with its head upstream.
    On slower moving water at least, (the squire pool you are familiar with) I have seen far more fish take the fly fished square, Beaully belly style, than a more traditional angled cast.
    Scott springer swears by it and in the low water, it's been coming up with the goods.
    “Some people take offense like it's a limited time offer.”

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