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  1. #1

    Default Bleeders, how common are they?

    Following on from the c+r thread, how often do the members on here encounter a bleeder? I've been lucky enough to not have had a bleeder since I've started fishing on mainly c+r rivers, not looking forward to the first though but so far so good... So how common are they amongst other members here?

  2. #2

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    Not very often for me. Never for atlantic salmon. Had a bleeder or three when I used to do more steelhead fishing (lake run rainbows, really, but silver as silver can be when fresh and shaped like a steelhead with every bit the muscle and fight) on the Great Lakes rivers, but Ive a larger sample size to go on as I caught a lot more of those fish when I was still regularly fishing there. Never had a bleeder that was dead upon or shortly after landing. They always swam off, but Ive a feeling they probably didnt make it. No idea, really, but so full of mercury and others toxins that I wasnt going to eat them anyway (there are those that do, despite the recommended daily consumption of these fish being max 1 serving per month).
    Heero just pawn in game of life.

  3. #3

    Default

    Had my fist one last year in the spring on the Tay, all c&r at that time, let me tell you I felt like a frecken criminal trying to hide it while walking back up the beat, and when I met the gillie he already new about it through a phone call.
    Lucky for me I was being watched and was seen as to do my best to revive the fish, the fish was hooked on the tongue and fought hard staying in main current, when I got it out of the fast water it just gave up, hardly a kick left in it, and anyone who knows me would tell you I don't go canny on them.
    On the upside its the only one and was handed over to the beat

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    949

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    Quote Originally Posted by WASNAEME View Post
    Had my fist one last year in the spring on the Tay, all c&r at that time, let me tell you I felt like a frecken criminal trying to hide it while walking back up the beat
    Close your eye's and just imagine how bad you will feel, when you got to put it back deed
    Bill Cook

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    In the shadow of Morven
    Posts
    498

    Default

    I'm lucky enough to see lots of fish landed to the fly in the coarse of a season,
    2014 I only had to deal with 3 bleeders out of triple figures.
    I can't speak for other methods, spinning,worming,
    There is always that fish that "doesn't get it wrong" and engulfs the fly.
    Having stopped using trebles a few seasons back, I find IMO only using doubles for the most part and occasionally singles I found it is easier to deal with deeper hooked fish without causing as much damage as a treble.

  6. #6

    Default

    I think there are a lot of variables depending on river, freshness of fish, size and method. I often get fish with a bit of mouth blood, but they will be fine. Genuine Gill hooked bleeders are rare in my experience. I will look up my diaries but I reckon less than 5% on a fly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Tyne valley
    Posts
    390

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    30 fish last year between wife and I on the Tyne mostly, one bleeder (stuck pig job!). My feeling that's fairly accurate 1/30 (salmon and sea trout in the UK). That's all on the fly, and almost always doubles.
    Last edited by Philor; 19-02-2015 at 11:24 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    In the shadow of Morven
    Posts
    498

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Loxie View Post
    I think there are a lot of variables depending on river, freshness of fish, size and method. I often get fish with a bit of mouth blood, but they will be fine. Genuine Gill hooked bleeders are rare in my experience. I will look up my diaries but I reckon less than 5% on a fly.
    I would agree with you on that,
    The fish I fear for are big ripe hens late in the season wea a good slush of water, they have an tendency to take the fly well down.
    Fresh grilse in a summer stream are so fleeting and quick there are very rarely deep hooked,

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    6,990

    Default

    On the fly, thankfully few! However it has happened and springers seen to the worst 'culprits'.

    Had to finally chap my first in March last year - was such a take that the fly was in the the gill rakes The third was within a few mm of going the same way.
    ..........so many flies, so little time!

  10. #10

    Default

    Interesting. I've just looked through my diary and the last hundred fly caught fish I caught I had 6 terminal bleeders, of which 2 I would have returned if possible. I'm not sure that the last hundred is a representative average but I can't be bothered tonight to check back any further. My guess of 5% is close enough for me. I have a mate who hardly ever gets a bleeder. Last season he had over 200 fish and only one bleeder, he tells me.

    Maybe the way you fish makes a difference?

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