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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Dunkeld (& Alnwick sometimes)
    Posts
    77

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    Quote Originally Posted by TommyC View Post
    Hey RussJ33 - I live in Terrace. If you fancy a day out fishing with me while you're here feel free to drop me a PM and we'll sort something out 👍
    TommyC- thanks for that, I will send you a PM
    He who casts last..............fishes longest !!!

  2. #12

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    I am jealous. I worked as a fishing guide on Quadra Island for a summer and in a hospital in Victoria for 6 months.

    Mid-August - the fish will be in the rivers although the main runs are later. The summer run steelhead are quite rare but incredible to see - the waters on the Island are so incredibly clear. Your best bet will be a local guide. Island outfitters in Victoria will help. The rivers often run low in August so may not be much going on. Salt water flyfishing for coho in Tofino is great fun though (but expensive).

    Cowichan - brown trout maybe some steelhead
    Stamp - possibly some steelhead, chinook
    Gold river - steelhead
    Campbell river - Pinks, Chinook
    Harrison Creek -steelhead. Theres a point at about '33km' on the road where you park and look down form the canyon. You can see them and in October, there will be schools of coho.

    It is not like the UK. The rivers are not very accessible. You park on the road and walk into the bush, bears are everywhere on the Island but not a threat. Where the rivers are accessible, you are often elbow to elbow with everyone else....

    Enjoy!

  3. #13

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    I am interested in this thread as I have a 2 weeks + trip in September - exact stop offs TBC but basically the classic Calgary to Vancouver trip through the Rockies and a couple of days on Vancouver Island.

    Probably very little fishing time but might try and pack some very basic tackle.

    As regards bears, from what I read and hear seems like generally they leave humans well alone - unless there is food involved (fish being caught, food in campsites etc).

    Anyone who lives/has lived out there, would you be fairly confident about wandering off into the countryside armed with nothing other than bear spray ?

    Have you ever had any "scary" bear encounters or heard of others that have ?

    Are both black bears and grizzlies very low risk if you come across them ?

    For the record, the better half is terrified of the thought of coming across bears (The Revenant is to blame for that !), I counter it with the programmes of the people who spend much of their lives with wild bears.

    Thanks in advance for any useful guidance.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Occasional salmon fisher View Post
    I am interested in this thread as I have a 2 weeks + trip in September - exact stop offs TBC but basically the classic Calgary to Vancouver trip through the Rockies and a couple of days on Vancouver Island.

    Probably very little fishing time but might try and pack some very basic tackle.

    As regards bears, from what I read and hear seems like generally they leave humans well alone - unless there is food involved (fish being caught, food in campsites etc).

    Anyone who lives/has lived out there, would you be fairly confident about wandering off into the countryside armed with nothing other than bear spray ?

    Have you ever had any "scary" bear encounters or heard of others that have ?

    Are both black bears and grizzlies very low risk if you come across them ?

    For the record, the better half is terrified of the thought of coming across bears (The Revenant is to blame for that !), I counter it with the programmes of the people who spend much of their lives with wild bears.

    Thanks in advance for any useful guidance.
    I'll stick my neck out and say that there are only Black bears on the Island to the best of my knowledge and are probably the least to worry about. Browns and Grizzlies are another matter and can be more aggressive. The video I posted was taken on the Campbell river in 2017 and is not an unusual encounter and the bears appear more interested in the fish. When you do have to be carefull is if the female has cubs with her and make sure you are not between her and the cubs. If one take a bit of interest our group have used whistles and tapped wading sticks on rocks or trees. A bear spray would be a last resort. I have been going over to the Island over the last 17 years and have never heard of a black bear attack but one of Big Ben's group had one run passed him coming up the track from the river. Not sure who was more surprised.20181007_175040-jpg

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Terrace, BC
    Posts
    73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Occasional salmon fisher View Post
    I am interested in this thread as I have a 2 weeks + trip in September - exact stop offs TBC but basically the classic Calgary to Vancouver trip through the Rockies and a couple of days on Vancouver Island.

    Probably very little fishing time but might try and pack some very basic tackle.

    As regards bears, from what I read and hear seems like generally they leave humans well alone - unless there is food involved (fish being caught, food in campsites etc).

    Anyone who lives/has lived out there, would you be fairly confident about wandering off into the countryside armed with nothing other than bear spray ?

    Have you ever had any "scary" bear encounters or heard of others that have ?

    Are both black bears and grizzlies very low risk if you come across them ?

    For the record, the better half is terrified of the thought of coming across bears (The Revenant is to blame for that !), I counter it with the programmes of the people who spend much of their lives with wild bears.

    Thanks in advance for any useful guidance.
    I do a lot of hiking through the woods in the Skeena Valley to get to my favourite fishing spots. I have bear bells attached to my rucksack and I carry bear spray and bear bangers. So far I've only seen bears at long range (100 yards plus). I also sing as I'm moving - i'm an awful singer so any bear that sticks around must be a glutton for punishment!

    I'm always slightly apprehensive moving through that terrain and it's probably only a matter of time before I have a close encounter.

    I've never encountered a grizzly on the ground but I've scoped out some spots to fish this year than are in grizzly territory. I actually saw a huge one two weeks ago on a scouting trip up a forest service track. Luckily, I was in my truck at the time!

    Moose are also a concern. They can be extremely bad tempered and unpredictable. The guys I fish with here are more worried about moose than bears. Statistically, the moose is the second deadliest animal in the world (after the hippo in case you were wondering). A lot of that is down to their tendency to run out in front of cars but during the rut the male are extremely aggressive. I understand that the train that runs through Terrace kills loads of male moose during the rut every year as they put their heads down and charge it!
    Last edited by TommyC; 18-06-2019 at 12:38 AM.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by bassfly View Post
    I'll stick my neck out and say that there are only Black bears on the Island to the best of my knowledge and are probably the least to worry about. Browns and Grizzlies are another matter and can be more aggressive. The video I posted was taken on the Campbell river in 2017 and is not an unusual encounter and the bears appear more interested in the fish. When you do have to be carefull is if the female has cubs with her and make sure you are not between her and the cubs. If one take a bit of interest our group have used whistles and tapped wading sticks on rocks or trees. A bear spray would be a last resort. I have been going over to the Island over the last 17 years and have never heard of a black bear attack but one of Big Ben's group had one run passed him coming up the track from the river. Not sure who was more surprised.20181007_175040-jpg

    That we did Alan,

    We actually spotted the bear running up the side of the road shortly before the "encounter". It was just getting light when we left to go fishing. Only a 10 minute drive from our digs up the side of Campbell River to the car park.

    Someone spotted it literally running up the side of the road before it disappeared into the woods just as the car got along side it. Looked massive but in reality Blacks are tiny in comparison to Grizzly Bears.

    When we got to the car park I flat refused to get out with a bear not far away before I was shamed into action by the rest of our group. "Great big jessie" or words to that affect.

    We got out and organised our gear before setting off down the track to the river. Still very dark so I had my torch with me. Ian leading the way with me second and the rest lagging behind a bit. You have to leave the footpath for 10 meters or so before getting into the river to then wade across to a gravel bar where we set up rods and fish.

    "BEAR!!!!!!!"

    Oh **** that will be the bear we spotted 10 mins ago. **** twitched big time.

    Ian is halfway between the path I am still on and the river when I spotted it flying up the side of the river doing about 20 mph!!

    BEAR!!!!!!!!


    The bear went hurtling past Ian knocking the rod he was carrying in the process. Thinking it was charging him he just roared at it then swore loudly at it and it disappeared into the undergrowth never to be seen again.

    We were all pissing ourselves laughing at this point making fun of our companions ability to attract big hairy things much to his amusement.

    According to Ian it smelled terribly prompting more jokes from us regarding personal hygiene.

    To sum up and having now gained first hand experience of Black Bears.

    Black bears are more scared of you than they are of them unless as Alan said above you encounter a mother and cubs.

    All the reports I hear of Grizzly is avoid at all costs any confrontation. Grizzly will use you as tooth picks.
    FISH ON!!! FISH OFF!!!!

  7. #17

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    Thanks for the information, everything I hear about black bears suggests they are the least likely to be a problem. They were the ones that the bloke on the programme was making friends with.

    Back on the mainland though (on the Calgary to Vancouver trip) I know there are quite a few grizzlies, my brother and family saw a few whilst driving.

    I guess I will just have to weigh this up if going for a hike around there !

    Has anyone on here come across grizzlies whilst hiking and if so how was it ?
    Last edited by Occasional salmon fisher; 18-06-2019 at 10:54 AM.

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