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Thread: New research finds salmon farming contributes to sea lice infestation on sea trout

  1. #1
    Editor is offline Fish&Fly
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    Default New research finds salmon farming contributes to sea lice infestation on sea trout

    Press Release: Inland Fisheries Ireland

    New research finds salmon farming contributes to sea lice infestation on sea trout as valuable stocks decline


    Monday, 9th January 2017: The Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland has welcomed new research by scientists from Inland Fisheries Ireland and Argyll Fisheries Trust (Scotland) which found that sea trout carry significantly higher levels of sea lice infestation closer to marine salmon farms.

    Researchers examined sea lice levels over 25 years from more than 20,000 sea trout. The sea trout were sampled from 94 separate river and lake systems in Ireland and Scotland at varying distances from salmon farms.


    The research revealed that sea trout captured closer to salmon farms had significantly higher levels of lice infestation and were found to be of reduced weight. Sea trout are known to remain for extended periods in near-coastal waters where the majority of salmon farms are located. This fish is therefore particularly vulnerable to sea lice impact, having the potential to encounter lice of farm origin throughout much of its marine life.


    The effect of the increased lice infestation was most evident in years of less rainfall, when a sea trout of average length (180mm) caught within 10 kilometres of a farm could weigh up to 10g less than fish of similar length caught more than 40 kilometres from a farm. The study covered the entire coasts of West Ireland and Scotland and accounted for variability in temperature and rainfall.


    The research article entitled ‘Aquaculture and environmental drivers of salmon lice infestation and body condition in sea trout’ was authored by Dr. Samuel Shephard and Dr. Paddy Gargan of Inland Fisheries Ireland alongside Craig MacIntyre of the Argyll Fisheries Trust. It was published in the international journal Aquaculture Environment Interactions in October.


    Studies have shown that the impact of sea lice in farmed areas on sea trout has been substantial with increased mortality, reduced body condition and a changed migratory behavior reported. Heavily liced sea trout return to freshwater prematurely to rid themselves of lice and exhibit very poor marine growth and greatly reduced marine survival. In fact, the most heavily lice infested sea trout die at sea. Rod catch data from 18 Connemara fisheries from 1974 to 2014 show a collapse in rod catch over the 1989/1990 period (see Figure 1). This collapse has been linked to lice infestation from salmon farms while recovery of sea trout rod catches to pre collapse levels has not occurred.


    Sea trout offer significant angling value while traditionally the species was abundant on the west coast of Ireland. Angling is worth €836 million to the Irish economy every year and supports upwards of 11,000 jobs, often in rural and peripheral communities. Inland Fisheries Ireland carries out research across fish populations, their habitats and the ecosystem with a view to informing the protection and conservation of this precious resource.


    Dr. Paddy Gargan, Senior Research Officer at Inland Fisheries Ireland and one of the report authors, said: “”While there had been some improvement in sea lice control in recent years, lice control on salmon farms was still not sufficient in certain west of Ireland bays during the spring migration period for sea trout to avoid heavy lice infestation and increased marine mortality. More effort is required to ensure lice levels on salmon farms are adequately controlled at this critical period when sea trout leave freshwater and enter the sea.”


    Dr. Cathal Gallagher, Head of Research and Development at Inland Fisheries Ireland said: “The finding that salmon farming is responsible for increased sea lice infestation and for significantly reduced body condition in sea trout may have implications for current lice control management strategies. This research will inform coastal zone planning of aquaculture in the future and contribute towards the avoidance of potential impact on sea trout stocks.


    Inland Fisheries Ireland is committed to protecting and conserving our fish populations and this research is crucial in managing the sea trout species in Ireland. This country is known as a unique angling destination as a result of its indigenous wild fish species and beautiful scenery. Continued investment in research is necessary to ensure the conservation and protection of our fisheries resource.”


    For more information on Inland Fisheries Ireland, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie and to download the full report, visit http://www.int-res.com/articles/aei2016/8/q008p597.pdf
    Andy R and Loxie like this.
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    Paul Sharman
    Editor-in-Chief
    Fish and Fly Ltd



  2. #2
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    Do try and keep up ..........

    Sea trout report 25 years in the making ...
    ibm59, seeking, NEbody and 2 others like this.
    To one who has roved on the mountains afar
    Oh! For the crags that are wild and magestic
    The steep frowning glories of dark Lochnagar.

  3. #3
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    Default Down on the Fish Farm..

    Article in Private Eye this week re. Marine Harvest using record breaking quantities of "Salmosan" (!!) in Scottish waters..
    Apparently those pesky little sea lice are becoming resistant to the insecticide..

  4. #4
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    I remember not so far back, that the original sea lice control "Slice" also lost it's effectiveness. All the more reason to take these farms out of the coastal waters and use closed containment systems.
    speydog, Andy R and Loxie like this.

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    Well knock me down with a feather it taken 25 years and god knows how much money to come to this ground breaking discovery,well all the Governments should hang their heads in shame for helping the salmon farming industry to get to this stage,for ignoring the people,other Countries,who,s Governments also try to cover up how bad it really is and our own government still thinks they should expand the salmon farming industry. You couldn,t make it up !!!

  6. #6
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    hope Dr Jaffa reads that one before anymore piffle in t&s!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Editor View Post
    Press Release: Inland Fisheries Ireland

    New research finds salmon farming contributes to sea lice infestation on sea trout as valuable stocks decline


    Monday, 9th January 2017: The Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland has welcomed new research by scientists from Inland Fisheries Ireland and Argyll Fisheries Trust (Scotland) which found that sea trout carry significantly higher levels of sea lice infestation closer to marine salmon farms.

    Researchers examined sea lice levels over 25 years from more than 20,000 sea trout. The sea trout were sampled from 94 separate river and lake systems in Ireland and Scotland at varying distances from salmon farms.


    The research revealed that sea trout captured closer to salmon farms had significantly higher levels of lice infestation and were found to be of reduced weight. Sea trout are known to remain for extended periods in near-coastal waters where the majority of salmon farms are located. This fish is therefore particularly vulnerable to sea lice impact, having the potential to encounter lice of farm origin throughout much of its marine life.


    The effect of the increased lice infestation was most evident in years of less rainfall, when a sea trout of average length (180mm) caught within 10 kilometres of a farm could weigh up to 10g less than fish of similar length caught more than 40 kilometres from a farm. The study covered the entire coasts of West Ireland and Scotland and accounted for variability in temperature and rainfall.


    The research article entitled ‘Aquaculture and environmental drivers of salmon lice infestation and body condition in sea trout’ was authored by Dr. Samuel Shephard and Dr. Paddy Gargan of Inland Fisheries Ireland alongside Craig MacIntyre of the Argyll Fisheries Trust. It was published in the international journal Aquaculture Environment Interactions in October.


    Studies have shown that the impact of sea lice in farmed areas on sea trout has been substantial with increased mortality, reduced body condition and a changed migratory behavior reported. Heavily liced sea trout return to freshwater prematurely to rid themselves of lice and exhibit very poor marine growth and greatly reduced marine survival. In fact, the most heavily lice infested sea trout die at sea. Rod catch data from 18 Connemara fisheries from 1974 to 2014 show a collapse in rod catch over the 1989/1990 period (see Figure 1). This collapse has been linked to lice infestation from salmon farms while recovery of sea trout rod catches to pre collapse levels has not occurred.


    Sea trout offer significant angling value while traditionally the species was abundant on the west coast of Ireland. Angling is worth €836 million to the Irish economy every year and supports upwards of 11,000 jobs, often in rural and peripheral communities. Inland Fisheries Ireland carries out research across fish populations, their habitats and the ecosystem with a view to informing the protection and conservation of this precious resource.


    Dr. Paddy Gargan, Senior Research Officer at Inland Fisheries Ireland and one of the report authors, said: “”While there had been some improvement in sea lice control in recent years, lice control on salmon farms was still not sufficient in certain west of Ireland bays during the spring migration period for sea trout to avoid heavy lice infestation and increased marine mortality. More effort is required to ensure lice levels on salmon farms are adequately controlled at this critical period when sea trout leave freshwater and enter the sea.”


    Dr. Cathal Gallagher, Head of Research and Development at Inland Fisheries Ireland said: “The finding that salmon farming is responsible for increased sea lice infestation and for significantly reduced body condition in sea trout may have implications for current lice control management strategies. This research will inform coastal zone planning of aquaculture in the future and contribute towards the avoidance of potential impact on sea trout stocks.


    Inland Fisheries Ireland is committed to protecting and conserving our fish populations and this research is crucial in managing the sea trout species in Ireland. This country is known as a unique angling destination as a result of its indigenous wild fish species and beautiful scenery. Continued investment in research is necessary to ensure the conservation and protection of our fisheries resource.”


    For more information on Inland Fisheries Ireland, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie and to download the full report, visit http://www.int-res.com/articles/aei2016/8/q008p597.pdf
    Oh my God. Please don't tell me that fish farms have anything to do with the decimation of salmon a sea trout in Scotland over the last thirty years, when SEPA have swept the whole question under the carpet? Our Scottish government is crapping itself about job losses WHEN the **** hits the fan about how unhealthy these fish are , and the pollution these farms produce.
    We have been complaining for decades and SEPA have proved to be less than useless. Now there is a respected report and let's hope for an honest response from our ( so called ) honest politicians, and no more whitewash from SEPA and our Scottish Governament.
    Please.
    Jack Holroyd.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Holroyd View Post
    Oh my God. Please don't tell me that fish farms have anything to do with the decimation of salmon a sea trout in Scotland over the last thirty years, when SEPA have swept the whole question under the carpet? Our Scottish government is crapping itself about job losses WHEN the **** hits the fan about how unhealthy these fish are , and the pollution these farms produce.
    We have been complaining for decades and SEPA have proved to be less than useless. Now there is a respected report and let's hope for an honest response from our ( so called ) honest politicians, and no more whitewash from SEPA and our Scottish Governament.
    Please.
    Jack Holroyd.
    If the Norwegian example is anything to go by, I am afraid that your "honest" politicians will sell you "porkies" to justify the salmon farming industry: jobs creation, income taxes etc... as they did and still do here. Our own fisheries minister came out last week with a tremendous figure: the salmon farming industry exports achieved a 91 billions NOK export sales in 2016 (roughly 9 billions UK £). What he forgot (?) to mention is that the Norwegian tax intake on this figure will probably be just a few percent ( between 2 and 3 % is an unofficial estimate). In other words, a few Norwegian "crownies" will see their financial assets growing exponentially, while the number of newly created jobs will be close to zero, the sealice problem will have increased exponentially , not to mention the poisoning of many of our fjords, due to the products used and all this on the basis of the gift made to these crownies to use (and destroy) one of our most important national assets: our fjords!! I will close this rather depressing round up by mentioning the disappointment of all the local communities councils, who accepted this new type of activities in their local waters, seeing it as an economic opportunity, while it has shown to be a double disaster:
    1/ for their local professional sea fishermen, the poisonous sealice treatments have depleted most of their livelihood: shrimps, crabs, and many sea fish such as cod, pollock etc...
    2/ the expected local tax income is non existent, the crownies spoil and pollute but don't pay for the damages!
    So good luck in your fight!
    zorro, Killbarry and Glenboig like this.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Thanks for the post Gauldalen.

    I also feel that the cards are stacked against anyone speaking out at these abominations, however will still continue to lobby politicians in the hope that somewhere deep inside there is some decency in them.
    Single Hander, zorro and Gauldalen like this.



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