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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Aberdeen
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    4,889

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    Nah, sorry.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Culrain. Sutherland
    Posts
    2,274

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    Have you considered that it might be your hooks, assuming you use them that is..

    Paul

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    581

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loxie View Post
    Other ideas could be the heads have more water resistance nearer the fly, you are less able to feel what is happening and anticipate the fishes reaction due to thin running line or it's just coincidence!
    I think there was a similar debate a couple months ago.

    I use spey lines, but sometimes use Airflo 40+ lines for trout fishing. One of the things I've noticed with these is that when there is a belly in the line and a fish takes, the thin running line lifts off the water as there is no weight to it. This creates slack between you and the fish. The fish however feels the weight of the head and spits the fly out without you connecting with it. With a spey line (or double taper trout line), there is more weight to the line and the belly 'digs in' to the water maintaining contact with the fish

    No real evidence that this is the case, but my theory, for what it's worth.
    I think I've got this work life balance thingy right.

    That is to say I spend more time in work thinking about fishing than I spend fishing and thinking about work!

  4. #14

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    Similar to an above post - probably fishing spey lines in better streamier water, with takes further from the rod tip on to a fast moving fly. The fish largely hook themselves, against a larger 'arc' of line that is under a consistent tension - the fish is on before you have time to mess it up.

    That's my guess, and only a guess.

    In theory you should catch more fish with shooting heads on balance though, as you can access more water, more takes etc etc
    Last edited by offshore; 29-12-2016 at 05:28 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    1,361

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    Are you using the same rod for shooting heads and spey lines?
    I seem to loose more fish with dedicated shooting head rods as againts the more traditional progressive action spey rod (which I now use for shooting heads in any case!).
    H

  6. #16

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    Maybe the problems because everythings a bit 'loose'.....sorry couldnt resist

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    carlisle
    Posts
    847

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hibernicus View Post
    Are you using the same rod for shooting heads and spey lines?
    I seem to loose more fish with dedicated shooting head rods as againts the more traditional progressive action spey rod (which I now use for shooting heads in any case!).
    H
    yeah I use a sage European 16ft for most the fishing I do. I've started only using the shooting head on windy days on wide beats

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by salarchaser View Post
    I use spey lines, but sometimes use Airflo 40+ lines for trout fishing. One of the things I've noticed with these is that when there is a belly in the line and a fish takes, the thin running line lifts off the water as there is no weight to it. This creates slack between you and the fish.
    You need to pay more attention.
    When that " lift " of the running line happens , there's a fish on the other end.
    It's very like using a swing tip when ledgering.
    Just " lift " your rod to set the hook.

    I used to do a LOT of dead drift buzzer fishing , and loved to see the line lift between rod tip and water.

    Incidently , if there was slack line then there could be no " lift "
    Last edited by ibm59; 29-12-2016 at 07:14 PM.
    Remember Thomas Muir of Huntershill

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    North Yorks
    Posts
    2,699

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    This thread exposes an interesting trait amongst salmon anglers. A little bit of anecdote here and there, all based on no more than statistical coincidence, and something becomes a belief. Soon people are proposing theories to explain it. And before long it becomes accepted "wisdom", in this case "one of the drawbacks of shooting heads is that they lose more fish".

    There's no supporting evidence and it can never be proven or disproven unless you find a way of hooking exactly the same fish, in exactly the same place and time, with precisely the same fly, hook, leader etc, successively with both types of line...and then repeating the trick a hundred times.

    On the other hand it all helps promote pleasant theorising and convivial Forum conversation to while away the dark evenings of the close season.

    Happy Christmas.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    581

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    Quote Originally Posted by ibm59 View Post
    You need to pay more attention.
    When that " lift " of the running line happens , there's a fish on the other end.
    It's very like using a swing tip when ledgering.
    Just " lift " your rod to set the hook.

    I used to do a LOT of dead drift buzzer fishing , and loved to see the line lift between rod tip and water.

    Incidently , if there was slack line then there could be no " lift "
    Don't think its about me not paying attention. I'm not talking about the lift of a few inches of line between the rod tip to the water, I'm talking about the lift of the running line to the back of the head. 20 yards with a belly is 18 yards in a straight line, so you have to pick up a couple yards of line to get everything tight to the back of the head which is the point I was making.

    I solved the problem by doing exactly the opposite. Keep the rod tip at water level and pull with the left hand. The drag through the water is greater than the drag through the air and usually sets the hook, or at least keeps things tight enough to keep the hook in place until everything pulls straight.
    I think I've got this work life balance thingy right.

    That is to say I spend more time in work thinking about fishing than I spend fishing and thinking about work!

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