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  1. #1

    Default Two Salmon Giants: Russia and Iceland is where wild salmon stocks are still in the be

    Ilya Serbovich of the Russia Salmon Association and Orri Vigfusson, Chairman of NASF, met in Reykjavik in May to review the world salmon situation in particularly the interceptory mixed stock fisheries.
    Russia and Iceland are joining forces to help bring the an end to the remaining commercial netting, particularly in Northern Norway and along the east coast of England and Scotland.
    _______
    Photograph: Ilya Serbovich of the Russia Salmon Association and Orri Vigfusson standing outside the Icelandic Parliament, May 2017.


    More...
    Hidden Content NASF's key focus is removing nets on the high seas and in coastal waters by brokering agreements. NASF also campaigns tirelessly for better regulations and salmon governance and in doing so promote land-based salmon farming, the removal of dams and bolstering spawning stocks.

  2. #2

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    Personally, I'm not convinced that this is where the focus should be on.
    Going back 40 years or so, there were netting stations all round the coast of Britain, taking hundreds of thousands of salmon annually, and there were still more than enough left over running the rivers that anglers had fish aplenty to target. As this had been conducted at similar levels for many years previously, clearly this was sustainable with stocks as they were.

    As salmon netting round Scotland is now negligible, and angling kills are also merely a fraction of what they once were, then obviously neither netting or angling has caused the decline, yet both of these are the factors that the finger of leading bodies are pointed at.

    I would love for one of our leading bodies (SANA) (SALSEA) etc etc to actually recognise, focus on and actually address the issues that are there rather than continually talking about it and endless - or so it seems - biologists gathering mountains of data before any action will be taken.

    By the time enough data is gathered, there may not be any migratory fish to survey.

    Then again - maybe that's the whole point. Allow wild salmon to become extinct, then anyone who enjoys eating salmon needs to buy a farmed fish - thereby making the farms more profitable, and with no anglers to complain - who else cares about the marine environment.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    N W Highlands
    Posts
    203

    Angry I've said it before.............

    the only species to benefit from the endless research and papers are the scientists. The recent speech by HRH amplifies the "need" for more research. I would like to read about some "action", where does all my subscriptions to the various bodies end up, whose pocket ? Maybe I due to my age I am getting too cranky and demanding, how do we motivate the "experts" with our funds into action to improve the lot of the diminishing Atlantic Salmon ? Soon there may be no salmon to research, then what will all these scientists do for a living ?

    M
    Start ankle deep with a short line, all wild fish go back

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    North Tyne
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Some one told me more salmon and sea trout where caught before they enterered the Tyne than went through the fish counter last year and the fish counter is not accurate measure any way with fish dropping back.... that's a massacre that happens yearly and in the event of modern gps ,sonar and satellite fish hunting aids will only get worse it's just not sustainable and why fishing gets harder every year.
    Im all for it just need the Russian navy to come down and blow the nets out of Tynemouth.
    Last edited by Mattytree; 22-06-2017 at 08:37 AM.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Glenboig View Post
    Personally, I'm not convinced that this is where the focus should be on.
    Going back 40 years or so, there were netting stations all round the coast of Britain, taking hundreds of thousands of salmon annually, and there were still more than enough left over running the rivers that anglers had fish aplenty to target. As this had been conducted at similar levels for many years previously, clearly this was sustainable with stocks as they were.

    As salmon netting round Scotland is now negligible, and angling kills are also merely a fraction of what they once were, then obviously neither netting or angling has caused the decline, yet both of these are the factors that the finger of leading bodies are pointed at.

    I would love for one of our leading bodies (SANA) (SALSEA) etc etc to actually recognise, focus on and actually address the issues that are there rather than continually talking about it and endless - or so it seems - biologists gathering mountains of data before any action will be taken.

    By the time enough data is gathered, there may not be any migratory fish to survey.

    Then again - maybe that's the whole point. Allow wild salmon to become extinct, then anyone who enjoys eating salmon needs to buy a farmed fish - thereby making the farms more profitable, and with no anglers to complain - who else cares about the marine environment.
    The thing about netters and anglers is that they are visible. The fact that that make no measurable difference to stocks is easily ignored because anglers see them, netsmen and other anglers, killing "their" fish and assume if they stop there will be loads more salmon for them to catch. That's the basis of the policy. At no point can it be shown to have worked. The real issues, IMO, are to be found in the freshwater, coastal and near coastal zones and are largely caused by the increasing impact of humans in one way or another; farming, from maize through trees to salmon, drinking water and sewerage in the main, but hydro, landfill and global warming will all play a part. These things are often hidden and nearly always hard to deal with. If we concentrate our resources here visible progress will be slight but the impacts on the aquatic environment will be large, and salmon will return in numbers.

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